STAMBERMILL VIADUCT

The Oxford, Worcester & Wolverhampton Railway

Stambermill Viaduct

 

The short lived original viaduct was constructed, then opened in 1850 by Isambard Kingdom Brunel to carry the Oxford Worcester and Wolverhampton Railway across the River Stour, the one we see today is not the original, which built of stone piers across the valley and then a wooden viaduct placed on top. There is still a tantalising glimpse of Brunel’s work in the brick abutment that stands alongside the new viaduct.

 

It was as early as 1858 that the old wooden structure came under scrutiny and the OWWR proposed a multipurpose Parliamentary bill which included asking for powers to replace the four timber viaducts, Coalbourn, Churchill and Kidderminster (Hoobrook), as well as the one at Stambermill, and replace them in the best way they thought suitable.

 

Fortunately for the OWWR, Hoobrook, Churchill and Stambermill were all in locations where new brick viaducts could be built alongside the existing structures. This negated the need to close the railway during these works. Once completed the track at each end was diverted on to the new structure and the old viaduct removed. Taking nearly 25 years before all three new structures would be opened.

 

Stambermill, is the second longest of the three at 190 yards long.

 

The Victorian viaduct can be seen in all its mgnificence across the small park with the River Stour running behind the undergrowth far right of the picture

Final span crossing the road with Stambermill Close off to the right

Unless otherwise stated alll pictures used herein are copyright Jane Taylor Potography all rights reserved. Ever efford has been made to obtain permission to use other photographs with links to thier own sites but if you believe your picture has been used without permission please contact us directly.

Licences for use of images may be obtained at a nominal cost by writing to info@railwayreinstatementassociation.couk. Licences will normally be granted free to charitable and not-for-profit organisations.

THE RAILWAY REINSTATEMENT ASSOCIATION

 

Take

Take

Take

Take

Take

 

 

Take